The Common Market in Antiquity

The European Common Market plays a prominent role in the media today. But how did it function in Antiquity? The Glyptotek marks Denmark’s assumption of the chairmanship of the EU by focussing on the kind of trade which was carried out in ancient Europe.

In the ancient world there was a lively mix of trade, exchange and piracy across the entire Mediterranean. Luxury goods from the Roman Empire also reached Denmark, where chieftains received gifts such as drinking goblets of silver and bronze. Such goblets and other costly trade items will be on show at the Glyptotek.

The exhibition will present trade items from the ancient European common market in the period from 800 BC to AD 400. This ranges from actual commerce to the exchange and importation of prestige gifts.

The exhibition focuses on two areas. One concentrates on the trade between Greeks and the indigenous inhabitants of Central and Southern Italy. The other focus is on trade from Italy and areas to its north.

One of the aspects covered by “The Common Market in Antiquity” is the extent to which Roman imported items and coins reached Denmark.

To mark the assumption of the chairmanship of the EU the Glyptotek has borrowed a number of exhibits from the National Museum of Denmark.